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Documentation

Registration Settings

The Registration Settings page allows you to enable registration for your blog. Visitors can register, create an account, and then uses that account to sign in and leave comments on your blog. Additionally on this page you can determine the methods by which commenters can identify themselves when they leave comments — anonymously, through Movable Type’s registration system, through OpenID or through Six Apart’s hosted services.

  • User Registration: This setting enables visitors to register as members of the blog. This field must be checked if you plan on having commenters authenticate using Movable Type’s local user authentication system.

  • Authentication Methods: This option allows you to configure one or more commenter authentication methods, in addition to enabling comments from anonymous (i.e. unauthenticated) users. The options are:

    • Anonymous Commenters: When checked, Movable Type will allow comments from anonymous (i.e. unauthenticated) users. Movable Type’s default templates include fields for users to provide their name, email address and URL, but even when users provide this information they are considered “Anonymous” because they have not authenticated through Movable Type or an OpenID service.

    • Movable Type: When checked, Movable Type will allow comments from users who have registered (and then authenticate) through your installation of Movable Type. Learn more about Movable Type’s member registration and authentication system.

    • OpenID: When checked, Movable Type will allow comments from users who have authenticated through an OpenID provider. When signing in to comment, users will be prompted to enter their OpenID URL. The system will then attempt to authenticate them at their OpenID provider, which may ask them to provide their username and password. On successful authentication at their OpenID provider the user will be redirected back to your blog to leave their comment.

    • LiveJournal: When checked, Movable Type will allow comments from users who have authenticated through the LiveJournal.com service (using OpenID). When signing in to comment, users will be prompted to enter their LiveJournal username. The system will then attempt to authenticate them (using the OpenID standard) at LiveJournal.com, which may ask them to provide their username and password. On successful authentication at LiveJournal.com the user will be redirected back to your blog to leave their comment.

    • TypePad: When checked, Movable type will allow comments from users who have authenticated through the TypePad service (using the TypeKey API). When signing in to comment, users will be directed to the TypeKey site to authenticate. On successful authentication at TypeKey the user will be redirected back to your blog to leave their comment. Additionally, you can also require the TypeKey service to pass the commenter’s email address back to Movable Type.

    • Google: Permit comments from users verified with Google accounts. Note that the Perl module Crypt::SSLeay is required for Google authentication.

    • WordPress.com: Permit comments from users verified with WordPress.com accounts.

    • Yahoo!: Permit comments from users verified with Yahoo accounts.

    • Yahoo! JAPAN: Permit comments from users verified with Yahoo! JAPAN accounts.

    • AIM: Permit comments from users verified with AIM accounts.

    • Livedoor: Permit comments from users verified with Livedoor accounts.

    • Hatena: Permit comments from users verified with Hatena accounts.

    • Mixi: Permit comments from users verified with Mixi accounts.

    • Facebook: Permit comments from users verified with Facebook accounts. (Requires configuration of the Facebook Commenters plugin.)

    • Vox was a blogging service authentication available in earlier versions of Movable Type, but is no longer available or functional.

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1 Comment

Mike Raynham

Mike Raynham on May 9, 2011, 8:21 a.m. Reply

Crypt::SSLeay is required for Google authentication.

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